Halacha for Sunday 15 Elul 5779 September 15 2019

Cooking After Baking

Approximately three weeks ago, we have explained that it is permissible to warm up a food that was fully-cooked before Shabbat on an electric hotplate on Shabbat as long as the food is dry, such as bourekas, kugels, and the like. Nevertheless, a liquid dish, such as soup and the like, may not be reheated on Shabbat. The reason for this is because of the law that “there is no cooking after cooking,” i.e. once something has been cooked before Shabbat, there is no prohibition to recook it on Shabbat, for this is considered warming, not cooking. However, the prohibition of recooking on Shabbat does apply to liquid dishes even if they were fully-cooked before Shabbat.

Based on the above, we have also discussed that it is permissible to take a food that was fully-cooked before Shabbat and immerse it into another boiling food on Shabbat. It is therefore permissible to place a hard-boiled egg into a pot of boiling water on Shabbat. It is likewise permissible to take a piece of fully-cooked meat and place it into a pot of boiling food on the electric hotplate on Shabbat since “there is no cooking after cooking.”

We must now discuss another aspect of this law. Does the prohibition of cooking on Shabbat apply to something which was already baked? For instance, if a kugel was baked in the oven before Shabbat, may if be reheated in a boiling pot of food on Shabbat?

The above question does not only apply to baked goods and would apply to grilled and roasted items as well. For instance, does the prohibition of “cooking after cooking” to such items, like a grilled steak or roasted nuts,” when reheated on Shabbat on an electric hotplate or not?

Indeed, the great Rishonim disagree regarding this issue. Rabbeinu Eliezer of Metz writes in his Sefer Yere’im (Chapter 102) that although there is no cooking after cooking, there is nevertheless cooking after grilling and baking. He proceeds to bring proofs to his opinion. He adds that for this reason, one must be careful not to immerse baked bread into a hot dish and if one has done so, this constitutes Shabbat desecration.

On the other hand, Ra’avaya (Rabbeinu Eliezer bar Yoel Ha’Levi) rebuffs the Sefer Yere’im’s opinion with a strong proof of his own. Maran Ha’Bet Yosef (Chapter 318) writes that the Ra’avaya’s question on Rabbeinu Eliezer of Metz is a strong one.

In Shulchan Aruch (Chapter 318, Section 5), Maran rules, as follows: “There is someone who says that something which was baked or grilled and later cooked on Shabbat, this constitutes the prohibition of cooking on Shabbat. Others permit this.” The Rama adds: “It is customary to be careful whenever possible not to place bread into a hot dish of food.”

Halachically speaking, Maran Rabbeinu Ovadia Yosef zt”l (in his Responsa Yabia Omer, Volume 8, Chapter 35 and Chazon Ovadia- Shabbat, Volume 4, page 306) rules, as follows: “According to the letter of the law, it is permissible to immerse something which has been baked or grilled into even a boiling dish of food. One who acts stringently and abstains from doing so is especially praiseworthy. Nevertheless, our Ashkenazi brethren customarily rule stringently on this matter, in accordance with the ruling of the Rama.”

Hagaon Harav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt”l (in his Shulchan Shlomo, Volume 2, page 320) adds that “Lukshen” or “Yerushalmi” kugel made from noodles that were cooked before the kugel as a whole was baked is considered a cooked food. Thus, even according to the Ashkenazi custom, it will be permissible to place such a kugel into a boiling dish of food on Shabbat. Similarly, croutons which were fried before Shabbat are considered a cooked food, not a baked good, and may be added to a hot soup on Shabbat.

Summary: According to the Sephardic custom, it is permissible to place a food baked before Shabbat into a boiling dish of food on Shabbat according to the letter of the law. However, the Ashkenazi custom is to act stringently in this regard.

8 Halachot Most Popular

Matanot La’Evyonim

In the previous Halacha we briefly discussed the Mitzvah of “Matanot La’Evyonim” on Purim day which is the distribution of two monetary gifts, one to each pauper. What Must One Give? In order to fulfill this Mitzvah, one need not give actual gifts; rather, it is permissible to ......

Read Halacha

The Laws of Mishloach Manot

The Mitzvah of Mishloach Manot The verse in the Megillat Esther (9, 22) states: “In order to mark them as days of feasting and merriment and sending portions (Mishloach Manot) to one another as well as giving gifts to the poor (Matanot La’Evyonim).” The Gemara in Masechet Megillah......

Read Halacha

The “Mechaye Ha’Metim” Blessing

In the previous Halacha we have explained that one who sees a truly dear friend or relative after thirty days f not seeing him and is happy to see him recites the “Shehecheyanu” blessing upon seeing him. The Gemara (Berachot 58b) states: “Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi said: One who se......

Read Halacha

Question: When should “Baruch Hu U’Varuch Shemo” be recited?

Answer: Moshe Rabbeinu exclaimed, “When I call upon the name of Hashem, exalt our G-d.” Onkelos translates this verse to mean that Moshe Rabbeinu meant to say that when I mention Hashem’s name in prayer, give praise to Hashem our G-d. Based on this, the Tur (Chapter 124) writes tha......

Read Halacha


Question: Must one answer “Baruch Hu U’Varuch Shemo” upon hearing the name of Hashem recited during Kiddush and Havdala?

Answer: In the previous Halacha we have explained the primary reason for answering “Baruch Hu U’Varuch Shemo” after hearing Hashem’s name, for this was indeed the custom of the Rosh who would answer “Baruch Hu U’Varuch Shemo” every time he heard Hashem&rsquo......

Read Halacha

Reciting the “Shehecheyanu” Blessing Upon Seeing a Dear Friend or Loved One

Question: If one travels overseas, returns home more than thirty days later, and is happy to see his wife or a dear friend when he returns, must one recite the “Shehecheyanu” blessing? Answer: The Gemara (Berachot 58b) states: “Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi said: One who sees his frie......

Read Halacha

Disassembling Doors and Windows on Shabbat

Question: May one remove a door from its hinges or a window from its frame on Shabbat? Answer: In the previous Halacha we have explained that one of the works forbidden on Shabbat is building. However, just as it is forbidden to build something or add anything to a standing edifice on Shabbat, it......

Read Halacha

Giving Birth on Shabbat

Question: If a pregnant woman knows that there is a reasonable chance that she will be giving birth on Shabbat (for instance, if her due date is on Shabbat) and as a result, if she begins experiencing contractions on Shabbat, Shabbat will have to be desecrated on her behalf by travelling to the hosp......

Read Halacha