Halacha for Wednesday 10 Iyar 5779 May 15 2019

Inserting Personal Requests in the Amida Prayer on a Constant Basis

Question: You have written in the Halacha Yomit that one may insert personal requests into the blessings of the Amida. Is this permitted even on a constant basis, i.e. adding personal requests in one’s Amida prayer every day?

Answer: Indeed, it is permissible to add personal requests into the middle blessings (blessings in between the first three and last three blessings of the Amida) of the Amida prayer based on the context of that specific blessing. Within the “Shema Kolenu” blessing, one may insert a request for anything one needs, as we have explained. Most Sephardic Siddurim nowadays have a text for Viduy (confessional prayer) and a prayer for one’s livelihood printed within the “Shema Kolenu” blessing. This idea is based on the words of our Sages who allowed personal prayers to be added within the Amida prayer.

The Turei Zahav writes (Chapter 122) that when our Sages permitted adding personal requests into the Amida, they only allowed doing this occasionally; however, one should not add personal requests on a daily basis, for this will seem like one is changing the standard prayer text that out Sages instituted since one is adopting a new text for himself with this new prayer.

Nevertheless, Maran Ha’Chida writes in his Birkei Yosef that the Turei Zahav’s opinion is halachically incorrect. The Kaf Ha’Chaim writes that even according to the Turei Zahav’s opinion, one may add the text of the Viduy and prayer for one’s livelihood into the “Shema Kolenu” blessing, for this text has already been mentioned by the holy Zohar and the Ari z”l and may therefore be added on a constant basis.

Indeed, the Yalkut Yosef (Tefillah, Volume 2, Chapter 119, Section 2) quotes the holy Zohar from which we can infer that every time one prays, one should confess one’s sins during the “Shema Kolenu” blessing. He proceeds to quote the Mekubalim who write that one should likewise pray for one’s livelihood during this blessing on a daily basis.

Thus, halachically speaking, regarding the texts of Viduy and prayer for one’s livelihood, one may rely on the words of the Poskim who allow this to be added even on a constant, daily basis. On the other hand, regarding other personal prayers, there is room for stringency and one should not add them on a constant basis; rather, one should change the wording of one’s personal prayers from time to time.

It is recounted that although Hagaon Harav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt”l had many constant personal requests while praying, such as praying for the ill and the like, he would nevertheless change the wording of his prayers from time to time or not insert his personal requests for a while so that it would not seem like he was instituting a new standard text into his prayer, in accordance with the opinion of the Turei Zahav.

8 Halachot Most Popular

The Laws of the Holiday of Sukkot

As per the request of many of our members and as a public service, we shall now list a synopsis of some laws which are essential for the upcoming Sukkot holiday: The Sukkah must be made of three walls and Sechach (the roof). The walls may be made of any material which can withstand a normal wi......

Read Halacha

Chol Ha’Mo’ed

The days between the first and seventh days (outside of Israel between the second and eighth days) of the Pesach holiday and the days between the first day of Sukkot and the holiday of Shemini Atzeret (outside of Israel between the second day of Sukkot and Shemini Atzeret) are called “Chol Ha&......

Read Halacha

The Blessing of “Lee’shev Ba’Sukkah”

Question: Regarding the “Lee’shev Ba’Sukkah” blessing, what is more halachically preferable: To recite the blessing while standing before sitting down to begin one’s meal in the Sukkah or should one recite this blessing when he is already seated after having recited the......

Read Halacha

The Laws of Dwelling in the Sukkah

Since we will not have enough time to discuss the laws of Sukkot between Yom Kippur and Sukkot, we shall therefore begin discussing some of the pertinent laws of the Sukkot holiday now. The Mitzvah of Dwelling in the Sukkah The Torah (Vayikra 23) states: “You shall dwell in the huts for se......

Read Halacha


Motza’ei Yom Kippur

Adding From the Mundane Onto the Holiness One must add some of the mundane weekday onto the holiness of Yom Kippur upon its exit, i.e. one should not end this holy day immediately with nightfall; rather, one should wait another few minutes. Thus, it is prohibited to eat or perform work on Motza&rsq......

Read Halacha

Simchat Torah

The Rambam (end of Chapter 8 of Hilchot Lulav) states: “Even though it is a Mitzvah to rejoice on all the festivals, there was an additional celebration in the Temple on the festival of Sukkot, as the Torah commands: ‘And you shall rejoice before Hashem, your G-d, for seven days.’ ......

Read Halacha

Erev Yom Kippur and Maran zt”l’s Epic Words, “I Forgive Everyone”

The Mitzvah to Eat on Erev Yom Kippur The Torah (Vayikra 23) states: “And you shall oppress yourselves on the ninth of the month at night,” meaning that the obligation to fast on Yom Kippur begins from the night of the tenth of Tishrei. Our Sages (Berachot 8a) inquired about the languag......

Read Halacha

Etrog Jam

Question: Is there any Segulah (auspicious practice) in eating Etrog jam? What is the proper blessing on such jam? Answer: There are women who customarily eat part of the Etrog (which was used for the Mitzvah) after the Sukkot holiday claiming that it is a Segulah to deliver one’s babies ea......

Read Halacha