Halacha for Monday 27 Cheshvan 5780 November 25 2019

Cooked Wine

Yesterday, we have explained that a Jew who publicly desecrates Shabbat and touches wine causes the wine to be forbidden, similar to the law of a non-Jew. The question becomes, when a religious son spends Shabbat with his non-religious parents and they made sure to purchase kosher wine but the father insists on pouring the wine for Kiddush, how can one avoid the prohibition of consuming forbidden wine without insulting one’s father?

Cooked Wine
Cooked wine, i.e. wine which was boiled over a fire, does not become prohibited when touched by a non-Jew. The Poskim explain that the reason why our Sages did not forbid cooked wine is because such wine was uncommon during the times of the Sages and their enactment therefore did not apply to it. The Rosh writes likewise (there are other reasons for this which we shall not discuss at this time). Thus, it is clear according to Halacha that a non-Jew touching cooked wine does not prohibit it, as Maran rules in his Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh De’ah, Chapter 123). Nevertheless, this only applies if the wine was cooked before being touched by the non-Jew, as we have explained regarding brandy; however, if the non-Jew touches the wine before it was cooked, even if it is cooked afterwards, the wine remains forbidden and may not be consumed.

Pasteurized Wine
The Poskim disagree regarding whether or not pasteurized wine (which is not actual boiling) shares the same law as cooked wine, for there is room to claim that only wine which has actually reached boiling point does not become forbidden when touched by a non-Jew but wine which has only been pasteurized cannot be considered cooked wine.

Indeed, Hagaon Harav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt”l rules that only wine which has been cooked to a point when its appearance has changed does not become forbidden; however, wine which was merely pasteurized and whose appearance remains the same is not considered cooked wine since even the non-Jew cannot tell that the wine has been cooked. He adds that according to the Rosh, the reason why cooked wine is permissible is because in those times, cooked wine was uncommon and the enactment of our Sages never applies to it. Nowadays, however, when cooked wine is very common, this reason should not be relied upon. Hagaon Harav Yosef Shalom Elyashiv zt”l ruled likewise.

After dealing with this matter at length, Maran Rabbeinu Ovadia Yosef zt”l rules that since our Sages never enacted that such wine should become forbidden, we cannot create new enactments of our own in order to forbid it. Although such cooked wine is quite common nowadays, since it was uncommon in the times of our Sages and their enactment subsequently never applied to it, it can never again become forbidden afterwards, for we do not have the authority to establish enactments the way the Sages of the Talmud did.

The Bottom Line
Halachically speaking, as long as the wine is pasteurized well, i.e. heated to a temperature of eighty degrees Celsius (or 176 degrees Fahrenheit), the wine can no longer become forbidden by being touched by a non-Jew (unless it is actually poured as an offering to an idol, in which case it certainly becomes forbidden by Torah law).

Regarding our question, there is certainly room for leniency if the son purchases specifically pasteurized wine, such as most grape juice on the market and other lower quality wines. In this way, there will be no concern if the non-Shabbat observant father wishes to pour the wine for him.

(When Maran zt”l served as Chief Rabbi of Israel, he instructed the Rishon Le’Zion Winery to pasteurize all of their wines to a temperature of eighty degrees Celsius, which would give the wine “cooked” status.)

Summary: Pasteurized wine does not become forbidden when touched by a non-Jew. It certainly does not become forbidden when touched by a non-Shabbat observant Jew. Similarly, if such wine was poured by a Jew who is not Shabbat observant, the wine is not forbidden for consumption at all and one may recite Kiddush upon it and drink it.

Ask the Rabbi


8 Halachot Most Popular

The Laws of Taking Haircuts During the “Three Weeks"

The Customary Prohibition of Haircuts As a result of the mourning observed during the “Three Weeks,” the Ashkenazi custom is to abstain from shaving and taking haircuts beginning from the Seventeenth of Tammuz until the Tenth of Av. The Sephardic Custom Nevertheless, the Sephardic c......

Read Halacha

Mourning Customs Observed During the “Three Weeks”

---------------------------------- By Popular Request: There is room for leniency regarding listening to music during the "Three Weeks" for those who are in isolation or quarantine in cases of need. This is especially true regarding young children and one must do one's utmost to lif......

Read Halacha

Eating Meat with Fish

Since we have discussed several laws related to eating meat and dairy in the previous days, let us now discuss some laws related to eating fish with either chicken or meat and other related laws. Fish Baked With Meat The Gemara in Masechet Pesachim (76b) states: “Regarding fish that was ba......

Read Halacha

The Prohibition to Eat Meat and Dairy on the Same Table

The Reasons and Parameters of This Law If one is eating dairy foods, our Sages have enacted that one may not allow meat foods to be placed on the same table. For instance, one who is eating bread with cheese may not place meat on the same table. The reason for this is because we are concerned that ......

Read Halacha


The Laws of Eating Meat and Dairy on the Same Table-Continued

In the previous Halacha we have explained that it is forbidden to eat dairy foods on a table on which meat foods are placed, for there is concern that the individual eating will taste some of the other foods on the table, thus having transgressed the grave prohibition of eating milk and meat togethe......

Read Halacha

The Laws of Glassware and Pyrex Regarding the Prohibition of Milk and Meat Mixtures-Continued

In the previous Halacha we have written that according to Maran Ha’Shulchan Aruch, glassware does not absorb any flavor from foods placed in it and thus, there is no prohibition to use a glass vessel for meat and then after it is washed well, to use it for dairy (although the Rama does rule st......

Read Halacha

Question: Must one designate two different sets of glassware for dairy and meat as one would with other utensils?

Question: Must one designate two different sets of glassware for dairy and meat as one would with other utensils? Answer: We have already established in the previous Halacha that one is obligated to designate two separate sets of dishes and flatware for dairy and meat, for dishes used with either......

Read Halacha

The “Shehecheyanu” Blessing on a New Garment

Question: When is the appropriate time to recite the “Shehecheyanu” blessing on a new garment, at the time of purchase or the first time one wears it? Similarly, must one recite this blessing for every new piece of clothing one purchases? Answer: The Mishnah (Berachot 54a) teaches us ......

Read Halacha