Halacha for Wednesday 9 Sivan 5779 June 12 2019

Laws of the Compensatory Prayer-Continued

In the previous Halachot we have explained that if one forgets to pray a certain prayer, the individual must compensate for the missed prayer by reciting the Amida of the next prayer twice, once for the current obligatory prayer and the second as a compensatory prayer for the prayer one missed.

The Poskim disagree whether or not the compensatory prayer must be recited immediately after the obligatory prayer. Some maintain that it must, i.e. that as soon as one concludes the Amida of the obligatory prayer, one must immediately begin the Amida once again for the compensatory prayer. Others write that that the two prayers do not need to be recited close together at all. Thus, according to the latter opinion, if one has forgotten to pray Arvit or if one has forgotten to mention “Ya’aleh Ve’Yavo” in the Arvit prayer of Chol Ha’Moed and the like (not the Rosh Chodesh Arvit prayer, though, for one does not repeat the Amida for omitting “Ya’aleh Ve’Yavo” from the Arvit prayer of Rosh Chodesh), one may pray Shacharit along with the congregation and following the Amida prayer one may recite “Ashrei”, “Uva Le’Zion”, conclude the entire prayer with the congregation, and only then recite the Amida prayer once again as the compensatory prayer.

Hagaon Harav David Yosef Shlit”a writes in his Halacha Berura that preferably, it is proper for one to pray the compensatory Amida prayer immediately following the obligatory Amida prayer without any interruption at all. One should not even interrupt between them to recite “Ashrei” and “Uva Le’Zion” and one should certainly not eat or take care of one’s business between them; rather, one should be quick to recite the compensatory prayer. Nevertheless, if one has interrupted between the prayers, whether one has done so by reciting “Ashrei” and “Uva Le’Zion” or by eating and the like, one must immediately stop what one is doing and recite the compensatory prayer. Before doing so though, one should stipulate a donated/voluntary prayer by thinking as follows: “If I am obligated to pray now, this prayer should be considered an obligatory prayer and if I am not obligated to pray, the following prayer is a donated prayer.”

Nevertheless, Maran Rabbeinu Ovadia Yosef zt”l writes that one who is praying Shacharit or Mincha along with the congregation and must recite a compensatory prayer may listen to the Chazzan’s repetition of the Amida and only afterwards begin the compensatory prayer, for the Chazzan’s repetition is not considered an interruption at all.

Our Sages only established the compensatory prayer for one who has not prayed inadvertently (or as a result of a situation beyond one’s control). However, if one has not prayed intentionally, one is not eligible to compensate this prayer.

8 Halachot Most Popular

The Laws of the Holiday of Sukkot

As per the request of many of our members and as a public service, we shall now list a synopsis of some laws which are essential for the upcoming Sukkot holiday: The Sukkah must be made of three walls and Sechach (the roof). The walls may be made of any material which can withstand a normal wi......

Read Halacha

Chol Ha’Mo’ed

The days between the first and seventh days (outside of Israel between the second and eighth days) of the Pesach holiday and the days between the first day of Sukkot and the holiday of Shemini Atzeret (outside of Israel between the second day of Sukkot and Shemini Atzeret) are called “Chol Ha&......

Read Halacha

The Blessing of “Lee’shev Ba’Sukkah”

Question: Regarding the “Lee’shev Ba’Sukkah” blessing, what is more halachically preferable: To recite the blessing while standing before sitting down to begin one’s meal in the Sukkah or should one recite this blessing when he is already seated after having recited the......

Read Halacha

The Laws of Dwelling in the Sukkah

Since we will not have enough time to discuss the laws of Sukkot between Yom Kippur and Sukkot, we shall therefore begin discussing some of the pertinent laws of the Sukkot holiday now. The Mitzvah of Dwelling in the Sukkah The Torah (Vayikra 23) states: “You shall dwell in the huts for se......

Read Halacha


Motza’ei Yom Kippur

Adding From the Mundane Onto the Holiness One must add some of the mundane weekday onto the holiness of Yom Kippur upon its exit, i.e. one should not end this holy day immediately with nightfall; rather, one should wait another few minutes. Thus, it is prohibited to eat or perform work on Motza&rsq......

Read Halacha

Simchat Torah

The Rambam (end of Chapter 8 of Hilchot Lulav) states: “Even though it is a Mitzvah to rejoice on all the festivals, there was an additional celebration in the Temple on the festival of Sukkot, as the Torah commands: ‘And you shall rejoice before Hashem, your G-d, for seven days.’ ......

Read Halacha

Erev Yom Kippur and Maran zt”l’s Epic Words, “I Forgive Everyone”

The Mitzvah to Eat on Erev Yom Kippur The Torah (Vayikra 23) states: “And you shall oppress yourselves on the ninth of the month at night,” meaning that the obligation to fast on Yom Kippur begins from the night of the tenth of Tishrei. Our Sages (Berachot 8a) inquired about the languag......

Read Halacha

Etrog Jam

Question: Is there any Segulah (auspicious practice) in eating Etrog jam? What is the proper blessing on such jam? Answer: There are women who customarily eat part of the Etrog (which was used for the Mitzvah) after the Sukkot holiday claiming that it is a Segulah to deliver one’s babies ea......

Read Halacha